Weekly Immigration News Digest 24th – 30th March 2018

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By Annabel Stuart-Bourne Immigration Law Solicitor Linkedin
Danielle Cohen has over 20 years of experience as a lawyer and a reputation for offering professional, honest and expert advice.
28 March 2018

A selection of the most important immigration news of the week.


‘The stress is making me ill’: woman’s immigration battle after 51 years in UK | The Guardian | 26.3.18

Sarah O’Connor has been living in Britain continuously since 1967, after moving here from Jamaica when she was 6, but is now facing severe debt with no way out. Since losing her job in the summer of 2017, she has not been able to claim benefits, nor does she have the paperwork or money to apply for a passport and therefore get another job. Despite her history in the UK, because O’Connor cannot prove her lawful continuous residence, the ‘hostile environment’ policy has left her hopeless, afraid of deportation or bankruptcy. Read the full article…

UK government to deport trans woman who faces ‘violence and rape’ in Thailand | Pink News | 21.3.18

A trans woman who was sex-trafficked into the UK in 2014 from Thailand, is currently being detained in Yarl’s Wood, facing deportation. She is a vulnerable individual who has suffered violence, rape and abuse, and the Home Office’s treatment of her is further damaging her mental health. She faces more abuse and danger to her life if she returns to Thailand, where trans people are much more prone to suffering. The government has failed to meet its humanitarian and legal obligations of protecting victims of abuse. Read the full article…

Home Office broke its own rules on avoiding family separations | The Guardian | 11.3.18

“To tear a parent away from his four children while the other parent is out of the country is a level of cruelty and disregard for the children that is on another level altogether.”
Despite guidance published by the Home Office in December about not separating children from both parents for immigration purposes, the 3 youngest children of a man in Manchester have been taken into the care of social workers since he was arrested. His wife went to Nigeria for a family funeral, but is trying to get back to her children as soon as possible. The Home Office must act in accordance with its own guidance, or situations like this arise in which children’s rights are not safeguarded as they are meant to be. Read the full article…

Home Office subcontractors force asylum seekers to share bedrooms in breach of council policy | The Independent | 22.3.18

Once again the mental health of asylum seekers, some of the most vulnerable members of society, is at risk of serious harm, after property developer Jomast has refused to comply with the policy forbidding bedroom sharing in Newcastle. The council and campaigners are calling for Jomast to drop their degrading and harmful attitude toward asylum seekers. Read the full article…

Theresa May concedes on EU migrants’ residency rights during Brexit transition | The Guardian | 28.2.18

The previously proposed two-year temporary residence permit given to EU migrants arriving in the UK during the transition period has been lengthened by the Prime Minister to five years, thus allowing these individuals the opportunity to build up five years of continuous residence and consequently apply for a permanent residence permit. This policy will allow far more migrants to settle permanently in Britain, although after the transition period, they will not have the same rights as other EU nationals who have already secured ‘settled status’, with regards to bringing over family to join them. Read the full article…

Waiting times for UK immigration appeals soar by 45% in a year | The Independent | 27.3.18

Even though there were only 7000 immigration appeals in 2017, a mere 28% of the number of appeals in 2014, the waiting time has reached an astonishing 12 months. The Home Office deals with older cases whilst new cases build up, meaning that individuals, some of whom do have the right to live in the UK, must put their lives on hold for a significant period. Read the full article…