Weekly Immigration News Digest 23rd – 29th June 2018

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By Annabel Stuart-Bourne Immigration Law Solicitor Linkedin
Danielle Cohen has over 20 years of experience as a lawyer and a reputation for offering professional, honest and expert advice.
29 June 2018

A selection of the most important immigration news of the week.


Britons want ‘smarter border control without blanket caps on migrants’ | The Independent | 24.6.18

A recent survey has found that many people support the Home Secretary’s move to remove medical professionals from the blanket cap on visas for skilled migrants; in fact, there seems to be much support to scrap the cap entirely. The Independent makes clear that it wants to see the blunt approach to lowering migration replaced with a smarter and more constructive policy. The attempt to reduce net migration by introducing visa caps is flawed, as the targets have been ‘consistently missed’. The article recognises that this is a critical time for immigration policy, and quotes a cabinet minister who said that a new post-Brexit immigration system is a chance to reform the outdated policy. Read the full article…

Majority back tough restrictions on immigration | The Express | 23.6.18

In contrast to the article above, which indicates strong support of removing blanket caps on migrant visas, the Express looks at a survey for Channel 4 News which would suggest that a large proportion of the public still back the harsh ‘hostile environment’ policy, and stronger control of borders. What is clear from both of these articles is that the public is very much divided on what kind of immigration policy they think is best for the UK, and that post-Brexit policy is sure to be opposed by a significant proportion of the public. Read the full article…

Slash ‘obscene’ Home Office fees, say MPs and campaigners | The Guardian | 24.6.18

Substantial charges by the Home Office for matters of asylum, immigration and more, have been debilitating to some families, resulting in a campaign to reduce the fees. This article tells us that the ‘hostile environment’ policy can be to blame for the continually-increasing charges. Shockingly, the Home Office made profits of up to 800% on some applications; an MP on the Home Affairs Select Committee has spoken out, saying that ‘it is never acceptable for them to make a profit on these crucial activities’. David Bolt is launching an inquiry into the charges. Read the full article…

The UK project giving refugees another chance at childhood | The Guardian | 29.6.18

The Guardian looks into a charity initiative called ‘Surviving for Thriving’, which addresses the needs of child refugees in the UK, from developing life skills, to socialising, to accessing mental health support. The project combines the expertise of three charities: British Red Cross, the Refugee Council, and UpRising. One individual who has fled to the UK from Iraq commented on the work of the project, saying that he has attended some classes which have helped him to sleep better. The article is extremely positive about the beneficial effects of this charity initiative, implying that it is changing, or even saving lives. Read the full article…

How the Jewish community is helping refugees integrate in Britain | The Jewish Chronicle | 22.6.18

Since the publication of the image of the child Alan Kurdi in 2015, the Jewish community has responded sympathetically to the refugee crisis. A rabbi from North-West London successfully managed to help settle at least 50 Syrian refugees, and continue to support them as they rebuild their lives. Refugees have vocalised their gratitude towards the Jewish community, with one individual saying that it has incentivised him to ‘give something back to the country’. Read the full article…

Government warned of ‘disastrous’ impact of Brexit on economy as immigration plummets | The Independent | 28.6.18
This article highlights the problem of not having a stable and consistent immigration system in place, explaining how the workforce is suffering from Brexit, and that the decline in workers cannot easily be reversed, which could become a very serious problem. Read the full article…