Weekly Immigration News Digest 26th May – 1st June 2018

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By Annabel Stuart-Bourne Immigration Law Solicitor Linkedin
Danielle Cohen has over 20 years of experience as a lawyer and a reputation for offering professional, honest and expert advice.
1 June 2018

A selection of the most important immigration news of the week.


Windrush scandal: how has it changed the immigration system? | The Guardian | 30.5.18

The Guardian reports on some positive changes which have come from this terrible, terrible situation whereby members of the Windrush generation, who arrived in the UK from 1948 onwards, as well as their children, have been wrongly targeted by the government’s “hostile environment” policies designed to deter illegal immigrants. Key changes have come in the form of citizenship documentation, compensation, suspending bank checks. Additionally, we are pleased to hear that the government has suspended the particularly callous arrangement of NHS sharing of patients’ details with the Home Office so it could trace people breaking immigration rules. Read the full article…

Migrants shouldn’t have to act like superheroes to earn respect — and we shouldn’t treat them as villains | The Evening Standard | 30.5.18

London’s Evening Standard columnist Ayesha Hazarika shares her opinions on the context of the story of Malian migrant, Mamoudou Gassama, nicknamed ‘Spiderman’ after he scaled the side of a building in Paris to rescue a child dangling off a balcony. Even though his actions were heroic and portrayed in the media favourably she argues we shouldn’t let this lull us into a false sense of security that migrants are made to feel welcome in France or indeed the UK. Read the full article…

Britons united in belief migration negatively impacts country, says left-leaning thinktank | The Express | 30.5.18
By all accounts it sounds like views of the columnist mentioned above article are founded on an element of truth if this article is anything to go by. This article reports on a survey undertaken by cross-party think tank, Demos. A total of 71 percent of those surveyed believed that British communities suffered division after migrants settled. Results of the report also suggested that British people think the government does not do enough to promote traditional British values. Read the full article…

Charities criticise ruling on asylum seekers forced to share rooms | The Guardian | 28.5.18

A tribunal has ruled in favour of a Home Office subcontractor, whose job is to house asylum seekers in the north-east, after Newcastle City Council had serviced six notices on them under section 139 of the Housing Act 20014. The council had argued that it was unacceptable for individuals to be forced to share bedrooms with strangers, especially those who did not speak the same language. Migration and Asylum Justice Forum said it was disappointed at the ruling. Read the full article…

Government U-turn over anti-terror law used to deport migrants | The Guardian | 29.5.18

High-tax paying applicants – including teachers, doctors, lawyers, engineers and IT professionals – had been refused indefinite leave to remain after being accused of lying in their applications for making minor and legal amendments to their tax records. Section 322(5) of the Immigration Act is based on character and conduct and has been used in deportation cases associated with terrorism. At least 19 migrants had been forced to leave the country as a result of the rule while many others have faced financial and emotional distress due to this power being misused. Read the full article…

Only ‘three of more than 60 people’ wrongly deported in Windrush scandal contacted by Home Office | The Sun | 30.5.18

The Sun reports that it is taking so long for Home Office officials to trace those wrongly removed in the Windrush scandal. It also suggests that three out of more than 60 have been identified. Read the full article…